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Call 703-844-0184 if you are interested in options for Ketamine treatment for Depression, Anxiety, PTSD, fibromyalgia, Lyme disease, CRPS, or other disorders.

 

The articles below link to research and mainstream media demonstrating the efficacy of Ketamine infusions and intranasal Ketamine approaches for depression. The IV formulation is very effective for immediate relief of depression and even suicidality. The effects are almost immediate in some of our cases.

 

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Ketamine Relieves Depression By Restoring Brain Connections

Chris Stephens, 28, has been battling depression all of his life. At times he wouldn’t get out of bed for weeks. In January, he said his depression hadn’t returned since he started taking ketamine.

Lianne Milton/For NPR

Scientists say they have figured out how an experimental drug called ketamine is able to relieve major depression in hours instead of weeks.

Researchers from Yale and the National Institute of Mental Health say ketamine seems to cause a burst of new connections to form between nerve cells in parts of the brain involved in emotion and mood.

The discovery, described in Science, should speed development of the first truly new depression drugs since the 1970s, the researchers say.

“It’s exciting,” says Ron Duman, a a psychiatarist and neurobiologist at Yale University. “The hope is that this new information about ketamine is really going to provide a whole array of new targets that can be developed that ultimately provide a much better way of treating depression.”

Ketamine is an FDA-approved anesthetic. It’s also a popular club drug that can produce out-of-body experiences. Not exactly the resume you’d expect for a depression drug.

But a few years ago, researchers discovered that ketamine could help people with major depression who hadn’t responded to other treatments. What’s more, the relief came almost instantly.

The discovery “represents maybe one of the biggest findings in the field over the last 50 years,” Duman says.

A rat neuron before (top) and after (bottom) ketamine treatment. The increased number of orange nodes are restored connections in the rat’s brain.

Ronald Duman/Yale University

Depression is associated with a loss of so-called synaptic connections between nerve cells, Duman says. So he and other scientists began to study mice exposed to stresses that produce symptoms a lot like those of human depression.

The stressed mice lost connections in certain parts of the brain. But a dose of ketamine was able to “rapidly increase these connections and also to rapidly reverse the deficits that are caused by stress,” Duman says.

A team at the National Institute of Mental Health also has found evidence that ketamine works by encouraging synaptic connections.

It’s possible to see the change just by studying rodent brain cells with a microscope, says Carlos Zarate from the Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program at NIMH.

A healthy neuron looks like a tree in spring, he says, with lots of branches and leaves extending toward synaptic connections with other neurons. “What happens in depression is there’s a shriveling of these branches and these leaves and It looks like a tree in winter. And a drug like ketamine does make the tree look like one back in spring.”

And there’s also indirect evidence that ketamine is restoring synaptic connections in people, Zarate says.

His team studied 30 depressed patients who got ketamine. And they found changes in brainwave activity that indicated the drug had strengthened connections between neurons in areas of the brain involved in depression.

All of this research is intended to produce drugs that will work like ketamine, but without the hallucinations. And several of these alternative drugs are already being tried in people.

Preliminary results suggest that “some of these compounds do have rapid antidepressant effects without the side effects that occur with ketamine,” Zarate says.

One of these drugs, called GLYX-13, has already been tested in two large groups of people — a key step toward FDA approval. The company that makes the drug, Naurex, says it will tell scientists how well GLYX-13 works at a meeting in December.

From Chaos To Calm: A Life Changed By Ketamine

 

Clinical experience using intranasal ketamine in the longitudinal treatment of juvenile bipolar disorder with fear of harm phenotype.

Clinical experience using intranasal ketamine in the longitudinal treatment of juvenile bipolar disorder with fear of harm phenotype.

 2018 Jan 1;225:545-551. doi: 10.1016/j.jad.2017.08.081. Epub 2017 Aug 30.

Clinical experience using intranasal ketamine in the longitudinal treatment of juvenile bipolar disorder with fear of harm phenotype.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Fear of Harm (FOH) is a pediatric onset phenotype of bipolar disorder (BD) characterized by BD plus treatment resistance, separation anxiety, aggressive obsessions, parasomnias, and thermal dysregulation. Intranasal ketamine (InK) in 12 youths with BD-FOH produced marked improvement during a two-week trial. Here we report on the open effectiveness and safety of InK in maintenance treatment of BD-FOH from the private practice of one author.

METHODS:

As part of a chart review, patients 18 years or older and parents of younger children responded to a clinical effectiveness and safety survey. Effectiveness was assessed from analysis of responses to 49 questions on symptomatology plus qualitative content analyses of written reports and chart review. Adverse events (AEs) were analyzed by frequency, duration and severity. Peak InK doses ranged from 20 to 360mg per administration.

RESULTS:

Surveys were completed on 45 patients treated with InK for 3 months to 6.5 years. Almost all patients were “much” to “very much” improved clinically and in ratings of social function and academic performance. Significant reductions were reported in all symptom categories. There were 13 reports of persistent AEs, none of which resulted in discontinuation. Acute emergence reactions were sporadically observed in up to 75%, but were mild and of brief duration.

LIMITATIONS:

Retrospective review from a single practice without placebo control with potential for response and recall bias.

CONCLUSIONS:

InK every 3-4 days at sub-anesthetic doses appeared to be a beneficial and well-tolerated treatment. Use of InK may be considered as a tertiary alternative in treatment refractory cases. Randomized control trials are warranted.

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Low-dose ketamine for treatment resistant depression in an academic clinical practice setting. <<< ARTICLE link

BACKGROUND:

Recent studies demonstrating a rapid, robust improvement in treatment resistant depression (TRD) following a single sub-anesthetic infusion of ketamine have generated much excitement. However, these studies are limited in their generalizability to the broader TRD population due to their subject exclusion criteria which typically limit psychiatric comorbidity, concurrent medication, and level of suicide risk. This paper describes the safety and efficacy of sub-anesthetic ketamine infusions in a naturalistic TRD patient sample participating in a real-world TRD treatment program within a major university health system.

METHODS:

The effects of a sub-anesthetic dose (0.5mg/kg) of ketamine infused IV over forty minutes on TRD patients participating in a treatment program at the University of California, San Diego was investigated by retrospectively analyzing the medical charts of 41 adult TRD patients with a diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) or Bipolar Disorder (BD).

RESULTS:

Subjects were aged 48.6, 78% white, 36.6% female, and 82.9% had MDD. Significant psychiatric comorbidity existed in 73%. Average pre-infusion BDI score was 32.6 ± 8.4 (S.D) and dropped to 16.8 ± 3.1 at 24-h post-infusion (p < 0.001). The 24-h response (≥ 50% reduction from pre-infusion) and remission (BDI <13) rates were 53.7% and 41.5%, respectively. Three quarters of responders maintained responder status at 7-days. Ketamine infusions were well tolerated with occasional nausea or anxiety and mild hemodynamic effects during the infusion.

LIMITATIONS:

Retrospective nature of this study, lack of control group and use of self-report depression ratings scales.

CONCLUSIONS:

This is the first published study of sub-anesthetic ketamine infusions in a real-world TRD population. The results suggest that this treatment is effective and well tolerated in this population.

 

BACKGROUND:

Recent studies demonstrating a rapid, robust improvement in treatment resistant depression (TRD) following a single sub-anesthetic infusion of ketamine have generated much excitement. However, these studies are limited in their generalizability to the broader TRD population due to their subject exclusion criteria which typically limit psychiatric comorbidity, concurrent medication, and level of suicide risk. This paper describes the safety and efficacy of sub-anesthetic ketamine infusions in a naturalistic TRD patient sample participating in a real-world TRD treatment program within a major university health system.

METHODS:

The effects of a sub-anesthetic dose (0.5mg/kg) of ketamine infused IV over forty minutes on TRD patients participating in a treatment program at the University of California, San Diego was investigated by retrospectively analyzing the medical charts of 41 adult TRD patients with a diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) or Bipolar Disorder (BD).

RESULTS:

Subjects were aged 48.6, 78% white, 36.6% female, and 82.9% had MDD. Significant psychiatric comorbidity existed in 73%. Average pre-infusion BDI score was 32.6 ± 8.4 (S.D) and dropped to 16.8 ± 3.1 at 24-h post-infusion (p < 0.001). The 24-h response (≥ 50% reduction from pre-infusion) and remission (BDI <13) rates were 53.7% and 41.5%, respectively. Three quarters of responders maintained responder status at 7-days. Ketamine infusions were well tolerated with occasional nausea or anxiety and mild hemodynamic effects during the infusion.

LIMITATIONS:

Retrospective nature of this study, lack of control group and use of self-report depression ratings scales.

CONCLUSIONS:

This is the first published study of sub-anesthetic ketamine infusions in a real-world TRD population. The results suggest that this treatment is effective and well tolerated in this population.

 

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